2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

21 - 30 of 155 results for: ECON

ECON 102A: Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists

Probabilistic modeling and statistical techniques relevant for economics. Concepts include: probability trees, conditional probability, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, correlation, central limit theorems, point estimation, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals for both one and two populations. Prerequisite: MATH 20 or MATH 41 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 102B: Applied Econometrics

Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals for population variances, chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests, hypothesis tests for independence, simple linear regression model, testing regression parameters, prediction, multiple regression, omitted variable bias, multicollinearity, F-tests, regression with indicator random variables, simultaneous equation models and instrumental variables. Topics vary slightly depending on the quarter. Prerequisites: Econ 102A or equivalent. Recommended: computer experience (course often uses STATA software to run regressions).
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 102C: Advanced Topics in Econometrics

The program evaluation problem. Identifying and estimating the effects of policies on outcomes of interest (e.g., tax rates on labor supply, etc.). Identifying and estimating the effects of human capital on earnings and other labor market outcomes. Topics: Instrumental variables estimation; limited dependent variable models (probit, logit, Tobit models); Panel data techniques (fixed and random effect models, dynamic panel data models); Duration models; Bootstrap and Estimation by Simulation. Prerequisite: Econ 102B
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 103: Econometric Methods: Theory and Applications

The construction and use of econometric models for analyzing economic phenomena. Students complete individual projects and core material. Topics vary with the instructor. Enrollment restricted to Juniors and Seniors. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: Econ 51 or 52, and 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Moreira, M. (PI)

ECON 106: World Food Economy (EARTHSYS 106, EARTHSYS 206, ECON 206, ESS 106, ESS 206)

The economics of food production, consumption, and trade. The micro- and macro- determinants of food supply and demand, including the interrelationship among food, income, population, and public-sector decision making. Emphasis on the role of agriculture in poverty alleviation, economic development, and environmental outcomes. (graduate students enroll in 206)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 107: Causal Inference and Program Evaluation

Methods for estimating and doing inference for causal effects. Discussion of randomized experiments, matching methods, the role of the propensity score, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, and natural experiments. Theoretical aspects of these methods as well as detailed applications drawn from economics, political science, education, and health care. Prerequisite: Econ 102A or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 110: History of Financial Crises

Financial crises are as old as financial markets themselves. There are many similarities between historical events. The 2008 credit crisis, for example, is far from unique. More often than not financial crises are the result of bubbles in certain asset classes or can be linked to a specific form of financial innovation. This course gives an overview of the history of financial crises, asset price bubbles, banking collapses and debt crises. We start with the Tulip mania in 1636 and end with the recent European debt crises. The purpose of the course is to understand the causes of past crises and to develop a conceptual framework that ties common elements together. We will discuss the lessons that we can draw for financial markets today. Prerequisites: Econ 50 or Econ 135.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 111: Money and Banking

The primary course goal is for students to master the logic, intuition and operation of a financial system - money, financial markets (money and capital markets, debt and equity markets, derivatives markets), and financial institutions and intermediaries (the Central Bank, depository institutions, credit unions, pension funds, insurance companies, venture capital firms, investment banks, mutual funds, etc.). In other words, how money/capital change hands between agents over time, directly and through institutions. Material will be both quantitative and qualitative, yet always highly analytical with a focus on active learning - there will be an approximately equal emphasis on solving mathematical finance problems (e.g. option pricing) and on policy analysis (e.g. monetary policy and financial regulation.) Students will not be rewarded for memorizing and regurgitating facts, but rather for demonstrating the ability to reason with difficult problems and situations with which they might not previously be familiar. Prerequisite: Econ 50, 52. Strongly recommended but not required: some familiarity with finance and statistics (e.g. Econ 135 or 140, Econ 102A)
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 112: Financial Markets and Institutions: Recent Developments

The course covers innovations, challenges and proposed changes to the financial system. Topics include new mortgage products, foreclosure rules, securitization, credit ratings, credit derivatives, dealer networks, repo financing, implications for prudential regulation & monetary policy. Emphasis is on quantitative studies of these topics. Prerequisites: Econ 52, Econ 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 113: Economics of Innovation (PUBLPOL 354)

The role of innovation and technological change in long run economic growth and the sources of innovation in science, technology, and commercialization. Founding of new industries and new markets. Commercialization of new technologies. Incentives and organization of science. Entrepreneurship. Openness and proprietary/controlled innovation. Selected public policies toward invention and innovation. The industrial revolution, the shifting international location of innovation, and the information revolution. Focus of the second half of the course is on the newest research on the newest industries. Prerequisites: 51,102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints