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61 - 70 of 155 results for: ECON

ECON 157: Imperfect Competition

The interaction between firms and consumers in markets that fall outside the benchmark competitive model. How firms acquire and exploit market power. Game theory and information economics to analyze how firms interact strategically. Topics include monopoly, price discrimination, oligopoly, collusion and cartel behavior, anti-competitive practices, the role of information in markets, anti-trust policy, and e-commerce. Sources include theoretical models, real-world examples, and empirical papers. Prerequisite: ECON 51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 158: Regulatory Economics

Economics 158 examines public policies for dealing with problems arising in markets in which competitive forces are weak. The focus is on monopolies, oligopolies, cartels, and other environments where market mechanisms are unlikely to produce outcomes that benefit consumers more than the alternatives involving costly government intervention. The two main areas examined are competition policy and economic regulation. Competition policy refers to laws that define certain market behavior as illegal because it is harmful to competition or fails to provide consumer benefits that justify its costs to consumers. Economic regulation refers to policies in which government controls prices and/or decides the terms and conditions under which firms can participate in a market. A growing area of study and policy design is the introduction of market mechanisms into formerly regulated industries such as: telecommunications, electricity, airlines, railroads, postal delivery services and environmental regulation. Cross-listed with Law 220. Prerequisites: Econ 51 or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 159: Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy

This course will advance students understanding of economic, legal, and political approaches to avoiding or managing the problem of global climate change. Theoretical contributions as well as empirical analyses will be considered. In addition to examining economic issues and legal constraints, it will address the political economy of various emissions-reduction strategies. The course will consider policy efforts at the local, national, and international levels. Specific topics include: interactions among overlapping climate policies and between new policies and pre-existing legal or regulatory frameworks; the role that jurisdictional or geographic scale can play in influencing the performance of climate-policy approaches; and numerical modeling and statistical analyses of climate-change policies. Cross-listed with Law 746. Prerequisites: Econ 50 & 51
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 160: Game Theory and Economic Applications

Introduction to game theory and its applications to economics. Topics: strategic and extensive form games, dominant strategies, Nash equilibrium, subgame-perfect equilibrium, and Bayesian equilibrium. The theory is applied to repeated games, voting, auctions, and bargaining with examples from economics and political science. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of calculus and basic probability theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 162: Games Developing Nations Play (POLISCI 247A, POLISCI 347A)

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 165: International Finance

This course presents the tools needed to analyze issues concerning the macro performance of an open economy in a world of high capital mobility. A consistent model is used throughout, one which captures the central mechanisms which re-equilibrate the economy in the short, intermediate and long runs. The model distinguishes between policy regimes and policy initiatives, thereby providing useful insights into classical results, such as long-run exchange-rate-regime neutrality.n Prerequisite: ECON 52.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 166: International Trade

Different sources of comparative advantage in production and trade among nations. Aggregate gains from trade, winners and losers from globalization. International migration, outsourcing and multinational companies. Trade policy and international trade agreements. Theory, empirical evidence, and real-life anecdotes. Lectures supplemented by in-class discussions of current topics covered in the popular press. Prerequisite: ECON 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Tendall, M. (PI)

ECON 178: Behavioral Economics

The field of behavioral economics draws on insights from other disciplines, especially psychology, to enrich our understanding of economic behavior. The course will discuss how people may display systematic behavioral patterns that diverge from the predictions of standard economic models, as well as the ways in which economists incorporate those considerations into their theories, and the implications of those theories for market outcomes and public policies. Prerequisites: ECON 51, ECON 102A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 179: Experimental Economics

Methods and major subject areas that have been addressed by laboratory experiments. Focus is on a series of experiments that build on one another. Topics include decision making, two player games, auctions, and market institutions. How experiments are used to learn about preferences and behavior, trust, fairness, and learning. Final presentation of group projects. Prerequisites: ECON 50, ECON 51, ECON 102A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Niederle, M. (PI)

ECON 180: Honors Game Theory

Rigorous introduction to game theory and applications. Topics include solution concepts for static and dynamic games of complete and incomplete information, signaling games, repeated games, bargaining, and elements of cooperative game theory. Applications mainly from economics, but also political science, biology, and computer science. Prerequisites: Experience with abstract mathematics and willingness to work hard. No background in economics required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Carroll, G. (PI)
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