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1 - 10 of 23 results for: JAPANGEN ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

JAPANGEN 51: Japanese Business Culture and Systems (JAPANGEN 251)

Japanese sociocultural dynamics in industrial and corporate structures, negotiating styles, decision making, and crisis management. Practicum on Japan market strategies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dasher, R. (PI)

JAPANGEN 82N: Joys and Pains of Growing Up and Older in Japan

What do old and young people share in common? With a focus on Japan, a country with a large long-living population, this seminar spotlights older people's lives as a reflectiion of culture and society, history, and current social and personal changes. Through discussion of multidisciplinary studies on age, analysis of narratives, and films, we will gain a closer understanding of Japanese society and the multiple meanings of growing up and older. Students will also create a short video/audio profile of an older individual, and we will explore cross-cultural comparisons. Held in Knight Bldg. Rm. 201.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPANGEN 92: Introduction to Japan

Required Japanese majors. Introduction to Japanese culture in historical context. Previous topics include:shifting paradigms of gender relations and performance, ancient mythology, court poetry and romance, medieval war tales, and the theaters of Noh, Bunraku, and Kabuki.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Carter, S. (PI)

JAPANGEN 121: Translating Japan, Translating the West (COMPLIT 142B, JAPANGEN 221)

Translation lies at the heart of all intercultural exchange. This course introduces students to the specific ways in which translation has shaped the image of Japan in the West, the image of the West in Japan, and Japan's self-image in the modern period. What texts and concepts were translated by each side, how, and to what effect? No prior knowledge of Japanese language necessary.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Levy, I. (PI)

JAPANGEN 133: Japanese Media Culture (JAPANGEN 233)

Focuses on the intertwined histories of the postwar Japanese television, anime, music, and video game industries, and how their development intersects with wider trends in Japanese society. We will pay particular attention to questions of affect, labor, and environment in media production, consumption, and style.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Roquet, P. (PI)

JAPANGEN 138: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (COMPLIT 138A, JAPANGEN 238)

This class introduces key literary texts from Japan's modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. Primary texts include: Futabatei Shimei's Floating Clouds, Higuchi Ichiyô's Child's Play, Natsume Sôseki's Kokoro, Kobayashi Takiji's Cannery Boat, Ôe Kenzaburô's The Catch, and Yoshimoto Banana's Kitchen. Examination of these literary works will be contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and postwar Japanese responses to the cold war), social developments (e.g., changing notions of social class, the women's rights movement, and the social effects of the postwar economic expansion), and cultural movements (e.g., literary reform movement of the 1890s, modernism of the 1920s and 30s, and postmodernism of the 1980s). The goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, to the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Reichert, J. (PI)

JAPANGEN 142: Gender, Sex, and Text in Early Modern Japan (JAPANGEN 242)

The early modern period in Japan (1600-1868) was a vibrant time when popular culture flourished, cities expanded, and people enjoyed a 'floating world' of transient, sensual delights. Reading popular literature from the time (in translation), including novels and poetry, and looking at explicit erotic imagery in woodblock prints as well as other visual media, we will discuss topics related to gender, sex, and sexuality. Critical scholarship by historians, art historians and scholars of literature will add to students' own readings of these primary sources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Corbett, R. (PI)

JAPANGEN 152: Art Animation (FILMSTUD 146, JAPANGEN 252)

While anime has spread around the world, Japanese art animators have been busy developing a parallel tradition, built from a more personal, experimental, and idiosyncratic approach to the medium. Looking closely at key works from major artists in the field, this course explores art animation from a variety of perspectives: animation scene; philosophical attempts to account for animated movement; and art animation's unique perspective on Japanese culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Roquet, P. (PI)

JAPANGEN 184: Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting (ARTHIST 184, ARTHIST 384, JAPANGEN 384)

Changes marking the transition from medieval to early modern Japanese society that generated a revolution in visual culture, as exemplified in subjects deemed fit for representation; how commoners joined elites in pictorializing their world, catalyzed by interactions with the Dutch.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPANGEN 186: Theme and Style in Japanese Art (ARTHIST 186, ARTHIST 386, JAPANGEN 286)

A mixture of lecture and discussion, this course presents a chronological introduction to some of the defining monuments in the history of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to the mid-19th century. This introductory class presumes no prior knowledge of art history or of Japan. We will emphasize certain overarching themes like religious life; notions of decorum appropriate to various classes (court, warrior, and commoner); the relationship between and among the arts, such as the visual and the verbal, or the symphonic assemblage arts as seen in the tea ceremony; pervasive cultural tropes like nostalgia, seasonality, or the sense of place; and broader issues such as censorship, patronage, gender issues, and the encounters between Japanese and foreign cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)
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