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191 - 200 of 217 results for: PSYCH

PSYCH 278: Social Cognitive Development: New Methods for Answering Old Questions

Novel technology can fuel new discoveries and generate new questions for future research, for instance, the use of video cameras has transformed the field of developmental psychology. More recently, the use of neuroimaging techniques (such as fMRI) to study the developing brain has been gaining lots of interest among developmental psychologists. What are the promises and challenges of using these neuroimaging methods to study cognitive development? This course will be a discussion-based seminar class (with some lectures from the instructor and from students) aimed for graduate students who are interested in learning more about how these methods can help address questions about cognitive development, with a particular focus on children's developing understanding of their social world.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 279: Topics in Cognitive Control

The processes that enable flexible behavior by biasing contextually relevant perceptual, mnemonic, and response representations or processing pathways. Cognitive control is central to volitional action, allowing work with memory, task/goal states, and overriding inappropriate responses. Current models of cognitive control, functional neuroimaging, and neuropsychological evidence. Recommended: 45. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 280: Foundations and Contemporary Topics in Social-Educational Psychology (EDUC 307)

At its core, social psychology is concerned with educational problems because it addresses the problem of how to change hearts and minds in lasting ways. This course explores the major ideas, theories, and findings of social psychology, their educational implications, and the insights they shed into how and when people change. There will be a focus on educational issues. Intersections with other disciplines, in particular social development and biology, will be addressed. Historical tensions and traditions, as well as classic studies and theories, will be covered. Graduate students from other disciplines, and advanced undergraduates, are welcome (class size permitting).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 281: Practicum in Teaching

Enrollment limited to teaching assistants in selected Psychology courses. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Bandura, A. (PI) ; Boroditsky, L. (PI) ; Bower, G. (PI) ; Carstensen, L. (PI) ; Clark, H. (PI) ; Dweck, C. (PI) ; Eberhardt, J. (PI) ; Fernald, A. (PI) ; Flavell, J. (PI) ; Gotlib, I. (PI) ; Grill-Spector, K. (PI) ; Gross, J. (PI) ; Haas, A. (PI) ; Hard, B. (PI) ; Hastorf, A. (PI) ; Heaney, C. (PI) ; Horowitz, L. (PI) ; Johnson, S. (PI) ; Knutson, B. (PI) ; Krumboltz, J. (PI) ; Lepper, J. (PI) ; Lepper, M. (PI) ; Maccoby, E. (PI) ; Markman, E. (PI) ; Markus, H. (PI) ; McClelland, J. (PI) ; McClure, S. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Ramscar, M. (PI) ; Rosenhan, D. (PI) ; Ross, L. (PI) ; Shepard, R. (PI) ; Steele, C. (PI) ; Thomas, E. (PI) ; Tormala, T. (PI) ; Tsai, J. (PI) ; Tversky, B. (PI) ; Wagner, A. (PI) ; Walton, G. (PI) ; Wandell, B. (PI) ; Wine, J. (PI) ; Winters, J. (PI) ; Zajonc, R. (PI) ; Zaki, J. (PI) ; Zimbardo, P. (PI)

PSYCH 282: Practicum in Teaching PSYCH 1

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 283: International Conflict Resolution Colloquium (IPS 250A)

(Same as LAW 611.) Sponsored by the Stanford Center on International Conflict and Negotiation (SCICN). Conflict, negotiation, and dispute resolution with emphasis on conflicts and disputes with an international dimension, including conflicts involving states, peoples, and political factions such as the Middle East and Northern Ireland. Guest speakers. Issues including international law, psychology, and political science, economics, anthropology, and criminology.
Terms: offered occasionally | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 283A: SPARQshop: Social Psychological Answers to Real-world Questions

Research, develop, and disseminate solutions to social problems in real-world settings such as police departments, schools, and hospitals. Get trained in research methods, community partnerships, mass media communication, data visualization, project management, and other useful skills. Must participate for credit for the full school year. Permission of instructor required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 284: Computational Modeling of a Range of Neural Circuits

Lectures, student presentations, and extensive software exercises. Focus on quantifiable models of neural signaling, starting with physical specification of input signals, sensory transductions, spiking, and mean electrical field potentials, and the inter-relation to BOLD signals (fMRI). Applications will be drawn from many examples, but a there will be a particular focus on the visual pathways and how measurements and models relate to visual perception.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 286: The Psychology of Everyday Morality (PSYCH 186)

Recent literature on morality from a social psychological perspective. Topics include moral judgment, moral intuitions, moral hypocrisy, moral identity, moralization, moral reproach, shame and guilt, temptations, and self-regulation. Contemporary psychological research emphasizing descriptive approaches (what people actually do) rather than normative ones (what one should do).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 287: Brain Machine Interfaces: Science, Technology, and Application (NSUR 287)

Lectures, student presentations, and extensive software exercises. Focus on quantifiable models of neural signaling, starting with physical specification of input signals, sensory transductions, spiking, and mean electrical field potentials, and the inter-relation to BOLD signals (fMRI). Also, interactions between electronic devices and the brain (brain-machine interactions) Applications will be drawn from many examples, but a there will be a particular focus on the visual pathways and how measurements and models relate to visual perception.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wandell, B. (PI)
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