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41 - 50 of 217 results for: PSYCH

PSYCH 105S: General Psychology

In what ways does the scientific study of psychology increase our understanding of the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors we observe and experience in everyday life? What are the main areas of psychology and the different questions they seek to answer? This course will give you an introduction to the field of psychology and its many different areas. You will learn about the central methods, findings, and unanswered questions of these areas, as well as how to interpret and critically evaluate research findings.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 106: Seminar on Visual Development

Describe basic development of visual system, introduce research methods/experimental designs, and present pathologies of visual development.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 107: Visual Processing of Faces

How do we perceive a face, recognize its identity or judge its subtle communicative cues (e.g. emotion or intention)? How does our ability to visually process faces develop with age and change though out our life span? What is the role of nature vs. nurture in this development? How do social attitudes, culture and face perception interact? In addressing these questions, we will learn about behavioral, electrophysiological and neuroimaging approaches to understanding face processing and critically examine the theories and original research that have defined the field. The course is designed to give you an in depth understanding of face processing while exposing you to methods and ideas that are useful in evaluating a wide range of cognitive neuroscience research.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 107S: Introduction to Social Psychology

A comprehensive overview of social psychology with in-depth lectures exploring the history of the field, reviewing major findings and highlighting areas of current research. Focus is on classic studies that have profoundly changed our understanding of human nature and social interaction, and, in turn, have triggered significant paradigm shifts within the field. Topics include: individuals and groups, conformity and obedience, attraction, intergroup relations, and judgment and decision-making.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 108: Longevity through Film

The media informs the understanding of life stages and shapes expectations about our futures. This course will explore the realities and fictions about life-span development through film. This course will revolve around selected films compared with the literature on life stages. Guest filmmakers, psychologists, sociologists and thought leaders will join the class to discuss human development.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 108S: Introduction to Social Psychology

This course aims to blend a comprehensive overview of social psychology with in-depth lectures exploring the history of the field, reviewing major findings and highlighting areas of current research. The course will focus on classic studies that have profoundly changed our understanding of human nature and social interaction, and, in turn, have triggered significant paradigm shifts within the field. Some of the topics covered in this class will include: individuals and groups, conformity and obedience, attraction, intergroup relations, and judgment and decision-making. The course, overall, will attempt to foster interest in social psychology as well as scientific curiosity in a fun, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 109S: Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

3)Introduction of the neurobiology of behavior including the biology of nervous system, the neural basis for perception, learning, memory, decision making and neurological disorders. Introduction to different research techniques that are prevalent in current neuroscience studies including fMRI, EEG, TMS and single unit recording.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 110: Research Methods and Experimental Design

Structured research exercises and design of an individual research project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 111S: Abnormal Psychology

This course will provide an introduction to abnormal psychology. It will be targeted towards students who have had little or no exposure to coursework on mental disorders. The course will have three core aims: 1) Explore the nature of mental disorders, including the phenomenology, signs/symptoms, and causal factors underlying various forms of mental illness, 2) Explore conventional and novel treatments for various mental disorders, 3) Develop critical thinking skills in the theory and empirical research into mental disorders. The course will explore a wide range of mental disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, addiction, eating disorders, and personality disorders.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Miller, C. (PI)

PSYCH 113S: Developmental Psychology

This class will introduce students to the basic principles of developmental psychology. As well as providing a more classic general overview, we will also look towards current methods and findings. Students will gain an appreciation of how developmental psychology as a science can be applied to their general understanding of children and the complicated process of growing into adults.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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