Blog topic: Digital library

Mike Furlough

Mike Furlough of HathiTrust

September 11, 2017
by Mimi Calter

HathiTrust - Overview & Strategic Directions

A presentation by Mike Furlough

SSRC conference room, Green Library

Thursday, Sept. 21st

10:30-12:00

A False Color 432 Landsat composite image, made in Google Earth Engine

Google makes 40 years of Earth observations available to researchers with Google Earth Engine!

June 21, 2017
by Mr. Stace D Maples

Last week I spent 3 days at Google for their annual Google Earth Engine Summit, learning about new features and applications of their Google Earth Engine technology. If you haven’t seen Google Earth Engine, I encourage you to go to https://earthengine.google.com and use the signup link to get an account. It’s absolutely free for non-commercial use and it’s capabilities are pretty mind-blowing.

Neighborhoods, Baghdad, 2010

Baghdad City data now available through EarthWorks

June 12, 2017
by Kimberly A Durante

Faculty, staff, and students affiliated with Stanford University can now find and access GIS vector shapefile data for Baghdad, Iraq using the EarthWorks discovery platform.

Created by LeadDog Consulting, this collection contains layers representing city streets, land use, points of interest, bodies of water, airports, neighborhoods, and railroads from 2010.

Transitioning workflows for EEMs

May 12, 2017
by Alexis C Manheim

The Stanford Libraries Mellon funded grant project, Everyday Electronic Materials (EEMs), created policy and practices as well as software and tools for selectors to add electronic items of scholarly interest to Stanford’s collections. Since its introduction in 2008, the EEMs system has been the gateway for adding thousands of digital items to Stanford's library collections, with full catalog records, workflows to support IP rights and payment needs, and persistent access via the Stanford Digital Repository.

Johan de Witt

A better home for your scholarly work: the Stanford Digital Repository

April 25, 2017
by Amy E. Hodge

What do you do when a Google search for an article title only returns one dead link and two advertisements? And yet you have this article in front of you so you know it exists? If you want to cite that article in a research paper but you don't have all the publication information to create the citation, you do the obvious thing.

You contact a librarian.

A student at Berkeley recently contacted Stanford Libraries, hoping that we could provide her with citation information for an article about Johan de Witt (the dashing gentleman in the image above) that she knew had come out of Stanford. The URL where she had accessed the article was at web.stanford.edu, but, sadly, this link no longer worked. She hoped someone at the library could help her identify the publisher of this article.

Tōshōsha Engi scrolls

Collotype art reproduction of restricted 1636-1640 Tōshōsha Engi scrolls now available online

February 16, 2017
by Astrid Johannah Smith

These delicately nuanced early reproductions were made using a collotype printing method, which uses light-sensitive gelatin colloid coated plates and photographic negatives to create fine detail. They were presented to Stanford University as a gift from David Starr Jordan, which is noted on a small commemorative plaque tucked in the box. "Before the Meiji Restoration of 1868, the pictures were inspected by the successive Shoguns on the occasion of their periodical visits to the Temples at Nikko, but no other persons were as a matter of fact permitted to view them." The pictures are now considered national treasures. See the fully digitized items online.

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