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Resources

The resources listed here include offices, articles, websites, slides, and other sources of information useful to graduate students. Use the search to find what you're looking for.

Your search returned 189 items.

Dissertation Boot Camp

Hume's Dissertation Boot Camp will accelerate your progress on a dissertation, master's thesis, or other graduate writing assignment.  It is designed to be a space that provides minimal distraction, a writing regimen/routine, peer motivation, and access to writing consultants. It equips you with writing productivity strategies and techniques that are of use beyond grad school. Boot camps are offered in 3-4 hour writing sessions on weekdays every quarter, including the summer.

Sign up for morning, early morning or evening boot camps. Registration is limited and on a first come, first served basis. Show up ready to write: Snacks and supplies are provided.

Last modified 08/06/2014

Stanford Profiles (formerly CAP Network)

Stanford Profiles is a virtual workspace for collaboration between among faculty, graduate students, postdocs and staff. Profiles is a directory with a social networking function that lets you work closely with colleagues in a private, secure environment.  You can customize your profile and track the colleagues and projects that matter to you.

Originally founded by the School of Medicine, in 2013 the CAP Network was expanded to partner with various Schools, Institutes, and administrative offices.

Last modified 08/28/2014

Hume Speaking Workshops

Hume has some general speaking skills workshops for graduate students from all disciplines and degree programs. Drop-in Vocal Yoga is a weekly voice workshop to get your voice in shape. Thursday English Advising (T.E.A.) is casual conversation for graduate and undergraduate non-native speakers of English, with sessions guided by oral communication and writing tutors.

Last modified 08/11/2014

Handshake

Replacing Cardinal Careers, Handshake is an online platform that provides Stanford students with opportunities, connections, events, and content related to their career aspirations and interests. Employers also access Handshake to post positions, create events, and connect with students.

Last modified 09/09/2015

Ten Rules of Good (and Bad) Studying

Your study habits can make or break your coursework and exams, so check out this list of good and bad habits from the Tomorrow's Professor Mailing List to see how your methods measure up. If you're already TGR, this list can help you explain good study habits to your students. 

Last modified 09/15/2014

Design for Extreme Affordability

Want to design products and services that change the lives of the world's poorest citizens? Design for Extreme Affordability is a two-quarter, multidisciplinary, project-based course where student teams work directly with partners to devise effective yet very low-cost solutions to problems. Open to students from all Stanford schools. Officially listed as ME206a-b/OIT333-33.Enrollment is capped at 40 and is by application only. Co-sponsored by the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design, the Graduate School of Business and the School of Mechanical Engineering.

Last modified 08/13/2014

Creating a Syllabus

Use this resource from the Teaching Commons to craft a syllabus that clearly communicates learning objectives, course content, and requirements. Organized as a template, it includes detailed descriptions of each element of a good syllabus, example text, and useful links to additional information. 

Last modified 09/24/2015

Advanced English Skills for Non-Native Speakers (Postdocs)

The Advanced English Skills for Non-Native Speakers is a year-long, 3-quarter, curriculum strictly for postdocs that is taught in small group, intensive 2-hour weekly class sessions. The complete curriculum is comprised of approximately 36 hours (12 per course) of in-class instruction, plus up to 4 individual tutorial hours with the instructors or course assistant over a 9-month period. Enrollment is limited to 24 postdocs per class. The aim is to refine proficiency in communicating in academic settings.

This curriculum is only open to postdoctoral scholars holding appointments at Stanford. There are no placement or pre-requisites for the courses but a minimum English proficiency is required at a level equivalent to TOEFL score of 525paper/197CBT/71iBT, TOEIC 625, IELTS 5.5.

 

Last modified 11/19/2014

Lane Library Classes and Workshops

Lane's instructional program consists of useful, skills-based workshops and classes open to all Stanford graduate students and postdocs. Here you'll find tools to locate funding sources, help you stay on top of the biomedical literature, and effectively manage references and bibliographies. Highlights include a workshop on search techniques and desktop utilities for google search. Especially useful for researchers in biomedical specialities.

Last modified 08/14/2014

SGSI 2016: Digital Publishing at a Crossroads: The Case of Stanford's Arcade

Explore the opportunities and challenges of open­‐access digital publishing through the case of Arcade, a "digital salon" for literature and the humanities that welcomes thousands of visitors weekly. Arcade is regarded as a model of intellectual exchange designed by and for scholars of literature; at the same time, it can be adapted to other fields, and most of the technical, legal, and practical issues it confronts demand a multi-disciplinary approach. Students will collaborate in small, interdisciplinary teams to think constructively about and propose solutions to these problems faced by Arcade and other websites—in digital publishing and in general.

Monday, Sept. 12 – Friday, Sept. 16, 10 AM - 4 PM

Instructor

  • Roland Greene, PhD, director, Arcade; professor of English and Comparative Literature

Audience & Capacity

Open to all graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in any discipline. Space is limited to 20.

Objectives

By participating fully in this course, you will:

  • Understand the opportunities and challenges of digital publishing in an open-­access, multi‐modal platform
  • Be familiar with the terminology and principles of web design and online content strategy
  • Have worked intensively on one major aspect of Arcade to identify a problem or question and to propose solutions  
  • Be well prepared to work on such sites in his or her areas of interest.

Summary

This course will explore the opportunities and challenges of open-access digital publishing through the case of Arcade, a "digital salon" for literature and the humanities that welcomes thousands of visitors weekly. Arcade is regarded as a model of intellectual exchange designed by and for scholars of literature; at the same time, most of the technical, legal, and practical issues it confronts are not exclusive to literature or the humanities but demand a multi-disciplinary approach. Its peers and interlocutors demonstrate different models of conversation and aggregation for both scholars and general readers: HASTAC, Public Books, H2O, Reddit, Storify, and many more.

As Arcade develops dramatically with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, it confronts choices about its identity and reach that are common to online scholarly publishing platforms. Peer review and its alternatives; blogging as an intellectual enterprise; and legal issues posed by the open-access model will figure prominently in Arcade’s expansion. Other problems faced by the site, including establishing identity and credibility; developing a user experience; and building and maintaining an audience, are relevant to online ventures in general.  Arcade's partners in its expansion include several institutions—university presses such as Chicago and Princeton, and Humanities Centers such as Chicago, Duke, and Washington—that expect to apply the lessons learned here across their wide‐ranging programs.

The course will be framed around the context of open-access, the history of digital scholarship, and website building. Experts in the digital humanities and open-access as well as figures in the industry of digital publishing and design will be invited to speak to the class as guest lecturers. Students will collaborate in small, interdisciplinary teams to think constructively about and propose solutions to these problems faced by Arcade and other websites—in digital publishing and in general.  The exact questions posed to the class will reflect to some degree the backgrounds and interests of the students.

Each meeting will involve, first, a morning session providing an overview of one major aspect of digital publishing, often addressed by a guest speaker in dialogue with the instructors; then, after lunch, an afternoon breakout session in which students convene in small groups to reflect on a problem or challenge related to the day's topic. The small groups will include the same students across the week. On the morning of the final day, each group will present a summary of its observations to the entire class, and the afternoon session will be devoted to general discussion of the issues judged by the class to remain the most difficult and exciting.

Guest Speakers

  • Dan Edelstein, editor, Republics of Letters; Professor of French and Italian
  • David Palumbo-Liu, editor, Occasion; Professor of Comparative Literature
  • Michael Keller, publisher, High Wire Press, Publisher of Stanford University Press

SUNet ID required to log in. The priority application deadline is Sunday, May 8.

Last modified 03/02/2016

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