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Sci Transl Med. 2014 May 14;6(236):236ra64. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3008523.

PHD inhibition mitigates and protects against radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity via HIF2.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
2
Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. giaccia@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity can be a major source of morbidity and mortality after radiation exposure. There is an unmet need for effective preventative or mitigative treatments against the potentially fatal diarrhea and water loss induced by radiation damage to the GI tract. We report that prolyl hydroxylase inhibition by genetic knockout or pharmacologic inhibition of all PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain) isoforms by the small-molecule dimethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG) increases hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) expression, improves epithelial integrity, reduces apoptosis, and increases intestinal angiogenesis, all of which are essential for radioprotection. HIF2, but not HIF1, is both necessary and sufficient to prevent radiation-induced GI toxicity and death. Increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression contributes to the protective effects of HIF2, because inhibition of VEGF function reversed the radioprotection and radiomitigation afforded by DMOG. Additionally, mortality from abdominal or total body irradiation was reduced even when DMOG was given 24 hours after exposure. Thus, prolyl hydroxylase inhibition represents a treatment strategy to protect against and mitigate GI toxicity from both therapeutic radiation and potentially lethal radiation exposures.

Comment in

PMID:
24828078
PMCID:
PMC4136475
DOI:
10.1126/scitranslmed.3008523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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