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Prev Med. 2014 Dec;69:8-12. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.08.024. Epub 2014 Aug 20.

Non-melanoma skin cancer and NSAID use in women with a history of skin cancer in the Women's Health Initiative.

Author information

1
University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Los Angeles, CA, United States; Stanford University, Department of Dermatology, Redwood City, CA, United States. Electronic address: awysong@usc.edu.
2
Stanford University, Department of Dermatology, Redwood City, CA, United States.
3
Stanford University School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA, United States.
4
Stanford University, Department of Dermatology, Redwood City, CA, United States; Stanford University School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA, United States; VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, United States.
5
Department of Dermatology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States.
6
Stanford University, Department of Dermatology, Redwood City, CA, United States; Stanford University School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Evidence for the effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) risk is inconsistent. We prospectively examined whether regular, inconsistent, or no/low-use of NSAIDs is associated with lower NMSC risk among 54,728 postmenopausal Caucasian women in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study enrolled between 1993 and 1998.

METHODS:

Logistic regression models were used to assess odds of NMSC after adjusting for skin type, sun exposure history and indication for NSAID use.

RESULTS:

There were 7652 incident cases of NMSC (median follow-up: 6.9years). There was no association between regular NSAID-use and NMSC risk relative to no/low-users. However, in a subgroup analysis of 5325 women with a history of skin cancer (incident NMSC: 1897), odds of NMSC were lower among regular NSAID users whether <5years (OR 0.82, 95% CI: 0.70-0.95) or ≥5years (OR 0.82, 95% CI: 0.69-0.98) of use compared to no/low-users. Inconsistent NSAID use and acetaminophen use were not associated with NMSC risk.

CONCLUSION:

Overall, NSAID use was not associated with NMSC risk. However, in women with a history of skin cancer, regular NSAID use was associated with 18% lower odds of NMSC. Future studies on potential chemopreventative effects of NSAIDs should focus on subjects with prior history of NMSC.

KEYWORDS:

Anti-inflammatory drugs; Aspirin; Female; Non-melanoma skin cancer; Non-steroidal

PMID:
25150382
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.08.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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